Sarah Rmb's Limb
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This is relatively new research and not posted with the intention of trying to change your view. Please feel free to share. 
INFORMATION ON EARLY SPAYING/NEUTERING 
"For those who wonder why we do not advise neutering your dogs before they are fully grown... this diagram shows you when growth plates close.
The sex hormones in both dogs and bitches, control when these growth plates close, ie when these bones stop lengthening.
If you neuter BEFORE they are closed, they keep growing longer, resulting in a taller, thinner, narrower dog but more importantly, in a dog who has some bones the right length and some not, which puts unnatural strain on ligaments, tendons and muscles and the joint itself.
Some of the notations on this diagram give a pretty big window, this is because small breeds will close sooner and larger breeds like the GSD will close much later.
Many people worry that early neutering will stunt their dogs growth but actually the opposite is true!
Please leave your dogs as nature intended until at the VERY earliest, 18 months old and ideally not before 2 and a half - because whilst those growth plates may be all done by 18 months, its only then that your dog STARTS to build his adult musculature and those hormones are involved in that too!"
Emma Judson - Canine Consultant


 
New Evidence Shows Link Between Spaying, Neutering and Cancer 
Don’t Neuter Your Dog YET – Read This Life-Saving Information First 

As a veterinary oncologist and founder of the pet hospice program Pawspice, Dr. Villalobos concedes, "It is earth shattering to consider that some of the cancers we have been battling may have been enhanced by early neutering instead of the reverse."

Once a huge advocate of spaying or neutering every dog early in life, after being in private practice for a few years, Dr. Becker noticed many of her canine patients were developing endocrine-related disorders. After a conversation with an expert in the field of veterinary endocrinology, Dr. Becker realized her practice of insisting on early spays or neuters for every dog patient had left many of them with serious health problems.


Illegal in Scandinavia, Surgical Sterilization Is Still Routine in America
September 23, 2013 | 85,247 views
Dr. Michelle Kutzler, an Expert in Animal Reproductive Physiology, Performs a Modified Spay Procedure That Preserves the Ovaries
Today I’ve invited an expert to discuss this topic in much more detail with us. Her name is Dr. Michelle Kutzler. Read more
 

Generations of veterinarians in the United States have been taught to recommend neutering for dogs between four to six months of age, and certainly before their first birthday. Relatively recent research has revealed compelling negative implications of such “early neutering” in Golden Retrievers, Labradors, Vizslas, and Rottweilers. Now, along comes more compelling research, this time pertaining to German Shepherd dogs.
Is your dog neutered? If so, at what age was the surgery performed?
http://speakingforspot.com/…/german-shepherd-dogs-the-impa…/

 
Several studies prove significant health risks associated with sterilization, particularly when done at an early age. The most problematic is a delayed closure of the bony growth plates. This results in an abnormal, skeletal development that increases the incidence of orthopaedic problems like hip dysplasia and patellar luxation. 

Three Reasons To Reconsider Spay/Neuter
Spay/Neuter and Joint Disease
Spay/Neuter and Cancer
Spay/Neuter and Behavior


Once a huge advocate of spaying or neutering every dog early in life, after being in private practice for a few years, Dr. Becker noticed many of her canine patients were developing endocrine-related disorders. After a conversation with an expert in the field of veterinary endocrinology, Dr. Becker realized her practice of insisting on early spays or neuters for every dog patient had left many of them with serious health problems.
Dr. Becker quickly changed her recommendation for her patients from automatic spays or neuters, and the younger the better, to a more holistic approach in which surgeries, including sterilization and de-sexing, should only be performed when there’s a medical necessity. She also believes shelter pets should be sterilized rather than de-sexed (spayed or neutered) in order to preserve their sex hormones.


Delay her spay

Spay
Journal of Etiology and Animal Health
Received: Dec 16, 2015, Accepted: Mar 05, 2016, Published: Mar 08, 2016
J Etiol Anim Health, Volume 1, Issue 1
Article Number: JEAH-1-002

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