Do you know what a Titer Test is?

Shockingly, many pet owners have no idea!

A titer test is a laboratory or in-house veterinary test measuring the existence and level of antibodies (necessary to fight off disease) in your pet’s blood. Basically, it’s a test that will tell you whether or not you actually need to vaccinate your pet.

Why is this so important?

Because of what can happen if you over-vaccinate your pet! “Vaccinosis”, the name for the chronic disease, is caused by continued use of vaccines. These symptoms mimic the original disease in parts.

The most basic method for a titer is where your pet’s blood is drawn and sent away for testing. It ranges anywhere from $150 to $200. The most affordable method is the new “in house” testing procedure. This test is preformed at the vet clinic and it takes about 20mins to get the results. The price range is anywhere from $60 to $80!

According to truth4pets.org, “Although titer testing may cost somewhat more than vaccination in the short run, it is a bargain long term. Titers do not have to be repeated yearly or even every three years. By testing rather than vaccinating, you avoid the risk of adverse reactions from unnecessary vaccines and the accompanying cost of treatment.”

So now you know... 
Pet Nutrition Blogger - Rodney Habib


Titre Testing: A Crash Course
June 7, 2012
When should you test titers?
Test titers no sooner than 2 weeks after vaccination.  Puppies may be tested before vaccination to establish when maternal immunity wanes and following the last vaccination after 14-16 weeks of age to determine if immunity was established.
“… even a single dose of modified live virus (MLV) canine core vaccines [distemper, hepatitis and parvovirus] or MLV feline core vaccines [feline parvovirus, feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus], when administered at 16 weeks or older, could provide long-term immunity [9 years or more] in a very high percentage of animals, while also increasing herd immunity.   


  
THE TROUBLE WITH TITERS 

If you’re concerned that your dog or cat will develop a vaccine-related health problem, but you want to make sure they’re protected against disease, annual titers are an economical alternative.



To titer or to revaccinate
Measuring antibody titers is becoming common in practice­—but remains confusing, even controversial.


An introduction to Veterinary Nosodes
Nosodes have been used in homeopathic medicine since the mid 1800s. Nosodes are relatively unknown in veterinary practice and very controversial in holistic veterinary practice. Many benefits have been noted, including a decrease in the severity and frequency of disease. Although nosodes are still controversial as a replacement for traditional vaccinations, evidence of their safety and efficacy is growing.
 
Nosodes: Can They Replace Vaccines? 1

Nosodes have been used in homeopathic medicine since the mid 1800s. Nosodes are relatively unknown in veterinary practice and somewhat controversial in holistic veterinary practice. Many benefits have been noted, including a decrease in the severity and frequency of disease. Although nosodes are still controversial as a replacement for traditional vaccinations, evidence of their safety and efficacy is growing.

Can nosodes replace vaccines? 2 What we do know is nosodes are working with a degree of efficacy to warrant further study and data collection. We know that they are a safe alternative to vaccines, and that they have been proven for home prophylaxis in human clinical trials. Because of their safety record, health benefits, and even the lower cost, nosodes are gaining popularity among holistic veterinarians and pet owners who are willing to give them a serious chance.

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